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Pupil Premium

Pupil premium strategy statement

 

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School Overview

Detail Data
School name Heath Park
Number of pupils in school 1180
Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils 43% of students from Year 7 to 11 are eligible for pupil premium. 41% of students from Year 7 to 13 are eligible.
Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended) 2021 – 2024
Date this statement was published 10/11/22
Date on which it will be reviewed 01/09/23
Statement authorised by Mrs Holloway
Pupil premium lead Mr Hafiz
Governor / Trustee lead Mr Selkirk

Funding overview

Detail Data
Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year £426,505
Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year £121,164
Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable) None
Total budget for this academic year
If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year
£547,669

Statement of Intent

At Heath Park our aim is to improve the academic outcomes for disadvantaged students so that their long term outcomes and opportunities improve.

With outcomes which compare very favourably with all students nationally at this stage, we aim to close the in-school gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students.

We wish to ensure that the use of the Pupil Premium fund puts provision for this group of students as an ongoing key priority for the school.

We are determined to raise aspirations of disadvantaged students allowing all students to succeed academically and move onto the further education regardless of their socio-economic circumstances.

We will look to provide the best quality classroom experience and provide the additional support (both academic and pastoral) which will allow individuals and groups to excel.

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils

Challenge number Detail of challenge
 

 

1

Curriculum Engagement – disadvantaged students can struggle to engage with the curriculum in the way that their peers may engage, due to:

o   Literacy and numeracy barriers

o   Lack of cultural capital to contextualise their learning

o   Lack of resources and financial barriers

 

 

2

Wellbeing – the wellbeing of disadvantaged is a challenge which manifests itself as:

o   Lower motivation

o   Poor resilience

o   Lack of confidence

 

 

3

Low aspirations – disadvantaged students are less aware of possible pathways than their peers which may include:

o   Access to further and higher education

o   Vocational routes

 

4

Most able disadvantaged students – this group of students have underperformed compared to their non-disadvantaged counter parts. Barriers may include

o   Poor study habits/ environments

o   Lower aspirations and motivation

o   Ability of guardians to support and guide adequately

Intended Outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategic plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome Success criteria
 

The intended outcomes for disadvantaged students improves

The Progress 8 and Attainment 8 scores for disadvantaged students are higher than the national average for all students and non-disadvantaged students. There is a 3 year upward trend both for Progress 8 and Attainment 8. The in-school gap for disadvantaged students in progress and attainment has closed.

The gap in reading ages for disadvantaged students is reduced.

 

 

 

 

 

The quality of classroom provision improves

The proportion of good and outstanding lessons improves.

 

Teachers and all support staff are fully informed of the strategies to deliver effectively for disadvantaged students. Clear use of disadvantage protocol within departments and disadvantaged students are identified on seating plans.

 

CPD and strategies for improvement is clearly based on national and international research.

 

Provision for disadvantaged students is explicitly evident and given high priority within quality assurance feedback and discussed in half termly Raising Attainment meetings.

 

Stakeholder feedback from disadvantaged students and their families indicates strong support for the classroom experience.

 

 

 

The wellbeing of students is fully supported

Disadvantaged students report high levels of wellbeing in school surveys.

 

Students receive pastoral care which meets their needs throughout their school career.

 

Disadvantaged students are exposed to other adults and cultural experiences which support their resilience and motivation.

 

 

Destinations for disadvantaged students shows ambition

The curriculum choices at Year 9 and Year 12 for disadvantaged students are informed by ambitious destinations.

 

The proportion of students applying to Russell Group universities and universities beyond the City increase.

 

The proportion of students applying to higher level apprenticeships improves.

Improved outcomes for Higher ability disadvantaged students The proportion of highest grades for disadvantaged students improves and the gap between the most able disadvantaged and the most able non-disadvantaged is closed.

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (For example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £328,600

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Use of National College webinars to ensure all colleagues are Covering a wide range of the EEF strategies to raise attainment

https://www.wcpp.org.uk/publication/the-role-of-cpd-in-closing-the-attainment-gap/

1, 2 & 4
Wide use of additional teaching staff in all subject areas to support planning, delivery and assessment Supports the EEF identified strategies of:

o   Individualised instruction

o   Feedback

o   Mentoring

o   Small group tuition

o   One to one tuition

o   Reducing class sizes

o   Improving Literacy and numeracy

1, 2 & 4
Wide use of learning support assistants across the curriculum and ability groupings Supports the EEF identified strategies of:

o   Small group tuition

o   Mentoring

o   Use of teaching assistants

1, 2 and 4
Excellence Academy provision Supports the EEF identified strategies of:

o   Summer schools

o   Peer tutoring

o   Metacognition

o   Mastery learning

o   Homework (learning beyond the classroom)

1, 2 & 3

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £82,151

 

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Access to laptops and internet access in school and at home Supports the EEF identified strategies of:

o   Digital technology

o   Homework

1 & 2
Post 16 tutoring of younger students in key areas Supports the EEF identified strategies of:

o   One to one tuition

o   Peer tutoring

2, 3 & 4
Subsidies for all school visits and experiences to build cultural capital in the widest sense https://www.governmentevents.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Steve-moffitt.pdf

 

https://www.sec-ed.co.uk/best-practice/pupil-premium-closing-the-vocabulary-gap/

 

1 & 3
Subsidised revision materials for students in Year 10 and 11 Supports the EEF identified strategies of:

o Homework

1 & 2
Targeted intervention beyond the school day to meet key needs Supports the EEF identified strategies of:

o   Extended school time

o   Feedback

o   Collaborative learning

1 & 2

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £136,918

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Focused EWO support to ensure all attendance issues addressed quickly https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/412638/The_link_between_absence_and_attainment_at_KS2_and_KS4.pdf

 

2 & 4
Focused pastoral manager support and identified pastoral programmes to provide a key worker and guidance and additional support Supports the EEF identified strategy of:

o   behaviour interventions

o   mentoring

o   social and emotional learning

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/370686/HT_briefing_layoutvFINALvii.pdf

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/219638/DFE-RR253.pdf

2 & 3
Priority support through Trust based behavioural Supports the EEF identified strategy of: 2 & 3

Programmes including withdrawn provision o   behaviour interventions

o   mentoring

o   social and emotional learning

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/370686/HT_briefing_layoutvFINALvii.pdf

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/219638/DFE-RR253.pdf

Priority CEIAG support including one to one consultations and readiness for work Supports the EEF identified strategies of:

o   aspirations intervention

o   mentoring

o   social emotional learning

2 & 3
Engagement with Aspire to HE in all years with targeted NCOP students Supports the EEF identified strategies of:

o   aspirations intervention

o   mentoring

o   social emotional learning

2 & 3
POWER programme to support resilience and ambition Supports the EEF identified strategies of:

o   mentoring

o   social emotional learning

2
Priority support through school nurse to address health and wellbeing concerns Supports the EEF identified strategies of:

o social emotional learning

2

Total budgeted cost: £547,669

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in 2021 to 2022 academic year.

Intended outcome Success criteria Impact/ Evaluation
 

 

The intended outcomes for disadvantaged students improves

The Progress 8 and Attainment 8 scores for disadvantaged students are higher than the national average for all students and non-disadvantaged students

 

The in-school gap in progress and attainment has closed

 

The proportion of highest grades for disadvantaged students improves

For the academic year 2021-2022

Average adjusted progress 8 score gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students was 0.2

 

Adjusted progress 8 score for disadvantaged students is +0.6

Average attainment 8 total point score for disadvantaged students is 51.7

 

The average national progress 8 score for 2019 for disadvantaged students was –0.45

The average national attainment 8 total point score for 2019 for disadvantaged students was 36.7.

(2021-2022 data not published yet)

 

This places Heath Park well above national average for both progress 8 and attainment 8 for disadvantaged students.

 

 

 

 

 

The quality of classroom provision improves

The proportion of good and outstanding lessons improves

 

Teachers and all support staff are fully informed of the strategies to deliver effectively for disadvantaged students

 

CPD and strategies for improvement is clearly based on national and international research

 

Provision for disadvantaged students is explicitly evident in quality assurance feedback

 

Stakeholder feedback from disadvantaged students and their families indicates strong support for the classroom experience

Every lesson in the academic year 2021-2022 was at least good with a significant proportion of outstanding practice.

 

Departments have embedded a disadvantaged protocol which highlights departmental strategies currently used by teachers to raise attainment of disadvantaged students.

 

The school uses the EEF toolkit to develop CPD strategies for all students including disadvantaged students.

 

The school is committed to the EFA project ‘Embedding Formative Assessment’ for CPD over the next two academic years to improve outcomes of all students including disadvantaged students.

 

The school has employed a Disadvantaged Lead who will monitor the progress of disadvantaged students in key meetings as well as within the quality assurance program.

 

Departments report on disadvantaged students after termly data collections.

 

Recent parent surveys and students’ surveys have shown positive feedback from all stakeholders regarding classroom experience all student groups.

 

 

 

The wellbeing of students is fully supported

Disadvantaged students report high levels of wellbeing in school surveys

 

Students receive pastoral care which meets their needs throughout their school career

 

Disadvantaged students are exposed to other adults and experiences which support their resilience and motivation

Recent wellbeing survey, Safety in School survey and general school experience survey have shown high levels of wellbeing for all student groups including disadvantaged students.

 

Dedicated pastoral manager for each year group monitors all student groups including disadvantaged students.

 

Dedicated student support teams monitor classroom behavior of all student groups including disadvantaged students.

 

Disadvantaged students have opportunities for guest speakers to help raise aspirations. They are supported in trips and have good representation in external programs.

 

 

 

Destinations for disadvantaged students shows ambition

The curriculum choices at Year 9 and Year 12 for disadvantaged students are informed by ambitious destinations.

 

The proportion of students applying to Russell Group universities and universities beyond the City increase.

 

The proportion of students applying to higher level apprenticeships improves.

A dedicated CIEAG Lead conducts one to one interviews with all students including disadvantaged students.

 

Form tutor discussions and CIEAG discussion ensure destinations are ambitious.

 

Curriculum choice for Year and Year 12 allows students to achieve and make very good progress.

 

22/25 (88%) of disadvantaged year 13 students went onto higher education at university studying a range of degrees including Engineering and Journalism.

No disadvantaged students went onto higher level apprenticeship courses.

The attendance of disadvantaged students improves Attendance is above the national average for all students

 

The in-school gap in attendance has closed

In the academic year 2021-2022 the average PP attendance from Year 7 to Year 13 was 90.59%. The average non-PP attendance was 92.51%.

The gap between PP and Non-PP is –1.92%.

 

The national average gap is 2020-2021 was -4.1% and the average national gap Autum 2021-Spring 2022 was -4.0%

 

This puts Heath Park well above national average for Pupil Premium attendance.

 

Externally provided programmes

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme Provider
Breakfast provision National Schools Breakfast Programme
National Citizenship Service Catch 22
Aspire to HE  University of Wolverhampton
Power Programme  Child First Trust
Back on Track  Wolverhampton YOT
RSE/PSHE  Haven
NACE challenge award NACE
Genesis Sun programmes Genesis Sun

 

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